Matt Tolmach Productions, Radar Pictures, Seven Bucks Productions,

Dwayne Johnson, Jack Black, Kevin Hart, Karen Gillan, Nick Jonas, Bobby Cannavale, Alex Wolff, Ser’Darius Blain, Madison Iseman, Morgan Turner, Missi Pyle, Rhys Darby, Tim Matheson, Maribeth Monroe, Marc Evan Jackson

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle is a sequel to the original Jumanji of over 20 years ago. Technology has changed since the original board game that was played by the kids in the original bringing Alan Parrish back from the jungle. In those days it was a board game, but apparently it had been updated at some point over the last 20 years to a video game console. A group of high school kids decided to give the game a try, and all four of them are pulled into the jungle where Alan lived during the time that he was trapped in the game. When they are sucked into the game, hence into the jungle itself, they become their characters that they chose in the original game. Here they are trapped unless they are able to complete the challenge and end the game.

This review was started over a year ago, and never completed. I wanted to say some things about this film, and now that it’s been out for a year or two, I still feel my observations might be of some value, so I decided to finish it. First of all, many folks did not like this film, for one reason or another, but I found it rather interesting for a number of reasons. First of all, the humor was here 100%. It was really funny from time to time. Secondly, some of the action seemed corny or contrived, but this is supposed to be a video game and as such is filled with different levels and scenarios. I felt this was appropriate for the situation. There are also some fun references to the original movie. Many people do not remember, but in the original movie, though Alan was stuck in the jungle for years until someone rolled a “six” or “eight” to free him, we never saw anything of what the jungle was like. The animals and characters from the jungle crossed over to our world, but we never went the other way. This time we get to see the jungle world, and even the place where Alan lived while he was stuck here. During the time Alan lived there he made friends and became somewhat of a hero over there. All in all, I found this to be really fun, and at this late date, if you haven’t seen these movies, I would suggest watching both of them back to back so that you can remember the important parts of the original. If you have seen the first one, but not this one, then I still recommend going back and watching the original again, so it’s all fresh when you watch this sequel. I think both movies are classics and ought to be enjoyed.

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Sidney Kimmel Entertainment, Lawrence Bender Productions, Little wave Productions,

Isabelle Huppert, Chloe Grace Moretz, Maika Monroe, Jane Perry, Jeff Hiller, Parker Sawyers, Brandon Lee Sears, Arthur Lee, Rosa Escoda

Frances McCullen (Chole Grace Moretz) is a waitress in an upscale Manhattan restaurant who lives with her roommate Erika (Maika Monroe). She is suffering the recent loss of her mother. One day she finds a purse left on the subway, and decides to return it to the owner. When she arrives at the home of Greta Hideg (Isabelle Huppert) she finds her a friendly, if not a little lonely, elderly lady who invites Frances in for coffee. They both find a friend in each other, until it becomes obvious that there is much more to Greta than meets the eye, and she has some really serious issues. Frances tries to cut the friendship off, but Greta isn’t that easy to get rid of.

This is one of the nicest thrillers I have seen in a long while. Chloe has turned into an amazing actress and she really does a great job in this film, but Isabelle Huppert is absolutely amazing in her role as the crazy lady. Her performance is completely terrifying and she gets a lot of credit for pulling this off perfectly. Sometimes the villain takes it way over the top, but her performance is just understated enough to keep us on the edge of our seat. The other cast members did a good job too, and maybe the credit goes to the screenwriters for such an excellent script. Anyway, it’s a Gothic type thriller right of the pages of the present Manhattan as the backdrop is very well chosen as well too, as it does a lot to add to the story. If you’re a fan of high energy thrillers, this is a great example of the genre, and one I would highly recommend. Excellent job!

EdG – EdsReview Dot Com – A Movie Review Blog

 

 

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Opinion – Fathom Events

Click below for the blog post:
Shannel Goettman every day discoveries with me Things-To-Do Thursdays Fathom Events: TCM Big Screen Classics

My daughter is right. Seeing classic movies on the big screen with a 2019 sound system is awesome. I am now waiting for the opportunity to go see one of the operas or ballets on the big screen to complete my cultural enlightenment.

Thanks TCM and Fathom Events for giving us this opportunity.

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Columbia Pictures Corporation, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), Regency Enterprises,

Claire Foy, Sverrir Gudnason, Lakeith Lee Stanfield, Sylvia Hoeks, Stephen Merchant, Claes Bang, Cameron Britton, Vicky Krieps, Synnøve Macody Lund

Lisbeth Salander (Claire Foy) is a hacker who is hired by a computer programmer to retrieve a program called Firefall, a program which is capable of accessing all the world’s nuclear codes. Frans Balder (Stephen Merchant), the programmer, wrote the program, but now feels it is too dangerous to have out there. Lisbeth is able to retrieve the program, but they are unable to unlock it. Once the program is stolen by Jan Holtser (Claes Bang) a mercenary steals the program and then the chase is on to recover it, providing they don’t die in the process in this high adventure chase story.

If there ever was a movie who’s trailer has nothing to do with the actual movie, this is it. I saw the trailer in the theater a number of times and it looked like a good story, but when I actually got to watch this DVD, I found myself totally lost in this movie. I didn’t ever really catch up and found it really confusing. There a lot of major problems in the story, and the technology of how the program has be retrieved really doesn’t make any sense. The whole premise is real strange. I just really did not get into this movie, and I just didn’t really enjoy it. I don’t recommend this movie. It just had nothing interesting in it to make it worth the time. I suggest you skip this one.

EdG – EdsReview Dot Com – A Movie Review Blog

 

 

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Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM),

Judy Garland, Frank Morgan, Ray Bolger, Bert Lahr, Jack Haley, Billie Burke, Margaret Hamilton, Charley Grapewin, Clara Blandick

Dorothy (Judy Garland) lives on a small farm in Kansas, but longs for a better world over the rainbow. When a tornado tears the house away with Dorothy inside, it lands on top of the Wicked Witch of the East, killing her. Dorothy finds out she is now in the land of Oz, and the only way back home is to travel to Emerald City to find the Wizard (Frank Morgan) to help her. On her journey, she finds new friends who join her on her quest to find her way back home.

I was lucky enough t be a child of the 50’s when Color TV’s were new, and the Wizard of Oz make a huge resurgence on a Sunday Night every year. My family could not afford a color set, but my Grandfather had one, and so we would visit her every time it was on TV along with all my Aunt and Uncles, and all my cousins. I was enthralled at the announcement repeated over and over that the beginning of the movie would be in Black and White, but when Dorothy arrives in OZ it would switch to beautiful color. This is because people would certainly think there was something wrong with their TV and keep banging on it to fix it. We used to do things like that. Fathom Events setup a two night special event which was so popular, another two nights were added. When I heard of the chance to see The Wizard of Oz on a big screen, something I had never done, I just couldn’t pass this up. First off, we were assured that the film was being shown in the original aspect ration, which was very small and only used a little of the center of the screen. 1939 was long before movies were made in the widescreen format that we’re used to today. My daughter went with me, and we were really anxious as the movie started. Everyone know this movie, which was really ahead of it’s time, but was sadly overshadowed (rightfully so I guess) by Gone With the Wind which was released the same year. Still this is a really wonderful film. A lot of the interesting facts about the movie are unknown to a lot of people, and some of them I found really fascinating. First of all, only the Cowardly Lion (Bert Lahr) was the original actor who was cast for his role. Dorothy was supposed to be played by Shirley Temple, but her studio refused to let her do it at the last moment, and Judy Garland was quickly cast. Judy was 16 at the time, and a bit old for Dorothy so they did all the could to make her more of a little child, and she did a wonderful job. Jack Haley (The Tin Man) was cast as the Scarecrow (and he would have been wonderful in that role) and Buddy Ebsen (Jed clampett) was cast as the Tin Man. But he had a severe allergic reaction to the aluminum makeup, and ended up in the hospital in critical condition. But being a giant movie studio in 1939, he wasn’t told that Buddy almost died, and all he know was that he was fired. So Jack Haley moved over to the Tin Man, and Ray Bolger was quickly hired as the Scarecrow. Shirley Temple was immediately put into a “blockbuster” technicolor film “The Blue Bird” which was expected to blow The Wizard of Oz out of the water, but was pretty much a flop while The Wizard became a huge part of American culture, and even affected our language. Phrases like “I don’t think we’re in Kansan anymore” and “There’s no place like home” are among the many phrases from this movie to take a role in our language. Seeing this film again in the theater with a theater sound system was an experience I will never forget. The only surprise though was in talking to everyone I meet about this experience, how many people have never seen this movie at all. Now that is a shame!

EdG – EdsReview Dot Com – A Movie Review Blog

 

 

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